Fat horses & starving sparrows: On bullshit in copyright debates

‘One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit’ – so begins moral philosopher Harry Frankfurt’s treatise on bullshit and its function. Bullshit comes, he argues, from one who ‘does not care whether the things he says describe reality correctly’, but says them regardless, in pursuit of their … Continue reading Fat horses & starving sparrows: On bullshit in copyright debates

British reversion right tested with Frank Sinatra songs

We've written before about 'reversion' laws - which protect authors by helping them recover their copyrights in certain situations. So you might be interested in knowing about a current American court case involving songs sung by Frank Sinatra.  Warner/Chappell, a publishing company, is suing another company, Bourne Co, who gets the royalties from songs written by composer … Continue reading British reversion right tested with Frank Sinatra songs

Everything he does, he does it for us. Why Bryan Adams is on to something important about copyright

Rebecca Giblin, Monash University Last Tuesday Bryan Adams entered the copyright debate. That’s Bryan Adams the singer and songwriter, the composer of “(Everything I Do) I Do It for You”, and “Summer of ’69”. Authors, artists and composers often have little bargaining power, and are often pressured to sign away their rights to their publisher … Continue reading Everything he does, he does it for us. Why Bryan Adams is on to something important about copyright

E-lending in public libraries: implications for authors

When I'm not working on the Author's Interest project, I'm leading a team of data science, communication and law researchers to investigate e-lending in public libraries. Here's some of us, beavering away at data collection last year Libraries have always been able to buy and lend physical books without needing anyone's permission. For e-books it's … Continue reading E-lending in public libraries: implications for authors

Copyright, Contracts and Creators – A Presentation by Professor Ruth Towse

We recently attended a presentation held by the Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia (IPRIA) at the Melbourne Business School by Professor Ruth Towse of Bournemouth University, who, like the Author’s Interest Project’s Rebecca Giblin, is also a Fellow of CREATe.  Professor Towse is an eminent cultural economist and has written widely about creative labour … Continue reading Copyright, Contracts and Creators – A Presentation by Professor Ruth Towse

New rights for French authors: what’s working and what’s still to get done?

A few weeks ago I visited the Société des gens de lettres (Society of People of Letters), a writers' society founded 180 years ago by Balzac, Hugo, Dumas and Sand. It is one of some eighteen societies with the mission of protecting authors' interests in France. I was particularly interested in finding out what the SDGL … Continue reading New rights for French authors: what’s working and what’s still to get done?